Lincoln and the Abolitionists John Quincy Adams Slavery and the Civil War The acclaimed biographer with a thought provoking exploration of how Abraham Lincoln s and John Quincy Adams experiences with slavery and race shaped their differing viewpoints provides both percept

  • Title: Lincoln and the Abolitionists: John Quincy Adams, Slavery, and the Civil War
  • Author: Fred Kaplan
  • ISBN: 9780062440006
  • Page: 435
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The acclaimed biographer, with a thought provoking exploration of how Abraham Lincoln s and John Quincy Adams experiences with slavery and race shaped their differing viewpoints, provides both perceptive insights into these two great presidents and a revealing perspective on race relations in modern America.Lincoln, who in afterlife became mythologized as the Great EmanciThe acclaimed biographer, with a thought provoking exploration of how Abraham Lincoln s and John Quincy Adams experiences with slavery and race shaped their differing viewpoints, provides both perceptive insights into these two great presidents and a revealing perspective on race relations in modern America.Lincoln, who in afterlife became mythologized as the Great Emancipator, was shaped by the values of the white America into which he was born While he viewed slavery as a moral crime abhorrent to American principles, he disapproved of anti slavery activists Until the last year of his life, he advocated voluntary deportation, concerned that free blacks in a white society would result in centuries of conflict In 1861, he had reluctantly taken the nation to war to save it While this devastating struggle would preserve the Union, it would also abolish slavery creating the biracial democracy Lincoln feared John Quincy Adams, forty years earlier, was convinced that only a civil war would end slavery and preserve the Union An antislavery activist, he had concluded that a multiracial America was inevitable.Lincoln and the Abolitionists, a frank look at Lincoln, warts and all, provides an in depth look at how these two presidents came to see the issues of slavery and race, and how that understanding shaped their perspectives In a far reaching historical narrative, Fred Kaplan offers a nuanced appreciation of both these great men and the events that have characterized race relations in America for than a century a legacy that continues to haunt us all.The book has a colorful supporting cast from the relatively obscure Dorcas Allen, Moses Parsons, Violet Parsons, Theophilus Parsons, Phoebe Adams, John King, Charles Fenton Mercer, Phillip Doddridge, David Walker, Usher F Linder, and H Ford Douglas to Elijah Lovejoy, Francis Scott Key, William Channing, Wendell Phillips, and Rufus King The cast includes Hannibal Hamlin, Lincoln s first vice president, and James Buchanan and Andrew Johnson, the two presidents on either side of Lincoln And it includes Abigail Adams, John Adams, Henry Clay, Stephen A Douglas, and Frederick Douglass, who hold honored places in the American historical memory.The subject of this book is slavery and racism, the paradox of Lincoln, our greatest president, as an antislavery moralist who believed in an exclusively white America and Adams, our most brilliant statesman, as an antislavery activist who had no doubt that the United States would become a multiracial nation It is as much about the present as the past.

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    About "Fred Kaplan"

    1. Fred Kaplan

      Fred Kaplan Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Lincoln and the Abolitionists: John Quincy Adams, Slavery, and the Civil War book, this is one of the most wanted Fred Kaplan author readers around the world.

    957 thoughts on “Lincoln and the Abolitionists: John Quincy Adams, Slavery, and the Civil War”

    1. Interesting how the distorted lens of history gives us a rose-colored view of Abraham Lincoln as a slave-fighting hero. He was not, at least not in the way he's typically portrayed. While he found slavery morally troubling, without the threat of secession by the south he likely would have been content to leave things as they were. In our modern-day terms, Abraham Lincoln could easily be described as a White Supremacist. Of course, we can't judge past generations by current standards, though it i [...]


    2. Had to quit this halfway through. The introduction is strong and sets out some interesting points but it quickly goes off the rails to infodump town. There is no focus to this book and no explanations either. It seems like it is setup like a popular history but it reads like a historian on cocaine, very boring cocaine. It hits you with U.S. policy and speeches one after another that vaguely relate to the introduction. When we got into George Washington' involvement with Haiti, I had to stop. It [...]


    3. Fred Kaplan is an accomplished author who has written critically praised books on Dickens, Vidal and James. This book examines Lincoln as an abolitionist. It is not a biography. It is not hagiography. It is based on the premise that Lincoln's sudden death made him into a secular saint and transformed into the Great Emancipator. Kaplan's Lincoln is a conservative politician who is fairly risk adverse and who does not want to wade into the waters surfed by the radical anti- slavery abolitionists. [...]


    4. As a Lincoln scholar, this was a tough book to read for a variety of reasons. Kaplan is obviously enamored of John Quincy Adams, the subject of one of his previous biographies. The book contrasts Adams's attitudes and actions regarding slavery with Lincoln's, finding Lincoln sorely lacking because he wasn't an active abolitionist. The author also seems to channel abolitionist Wendell Phillips, the northern abolitionist that mirrored the extremism of the southern pro-slavery firebrands. Phillips [...]



    5. The author compares the views on slavery of John Quincy Adams to those of Abraham Lincoln, and describes the contribution to their perspectives by a number of lesser known abolitionists, such as Wendell Phillips and Elijah Lovejoy. Despite the fact that Lincoln faced enormous challenges in preserving the Union during the Civil War, he comes up short in the presidential comparison. While the author goes into great detail to show how their views evolved over time and were influenced by events of t [...]


    6. Unless you get your history from Ken Burns or Steven Spielberg, you are probably aware that Abraham Lincoln was in no way, shape, or form an abolitionist when it came to slavery in the United States. A supporter of the American Colonization Society which promoted the removal and resettling of freed slaves out of the United States, Lincoln never envisioned former slaves and whites being able to live peaceably, side by side. Lincoln went to war to preserve the Union, not to free the slaves. In fac [...]


    7. "The bloodiest war ever waged is infinitely better than the happiest slavery which ever fattened men into obedience. And yet I love peace. But it is real peace; not peace such as we have had; not peace that meant lynch-law in the Carolinas and mob law in New York; not peace that meant chains around Boston Court-House, a gag on the lips of statesmen, and the slave sobbing himself to sleep in curses. No more such peace for me; no peace that is not born of justice, and does not recognize the rights [...]


    8. I was given a copy of this book by HarperCollins in exchange for an honest review.Today's post is on Lincoln and the Abolitionists: John Quincy Adams, Slavery, and the Civil War  by Fred Kaplan. It is 352 pages long and is published by HarperCollins. The cover is white with pictures of the different people that are discussed in this book on it. The intended reader is someone who is interested in American history and the people behind the myths. There is mild foul language, no sex, and violenc [...]


    9. First, the negatives: You'll get your exercise reading this book, which lunges and jumps around in its presentation of political attitudes on race from the Federalist period through the Civil War. It also could have used a stronger editing hand--I once counted three consecutive sentences each one of which said the same thing in a slightly different way. Most damningly for a work of history, it contains at least one glaring and basic error of fact: "Tennessee had never left the Union," the author [...]


    10. A historical account of the abolition of slavery in the US. The focus is on John Quincy Adams and Abraham Lincoln. Adams of course precedes Lincoln but is firmly for the abolition of slavery. Lincoln has a more nuanced view and is in favor of colonization where the liberated slaves are resettled in Africa. America's expansion west exacerbates the disagreement over the issue of slavery as the Southern States are for slavery in the new States while the Northern States wish to limit it to those Sta [...]


    11. The interesting part of this book for me were the sidelines in which the author describes the life and work of several abolitionists and especially details the work of John Quincy Adams. The boring part is the way he incessantly tries to debunk the reputation of Abraham Lincoln because he wasn't an abolitionist or at the forefront of the racial debate. I especially found it annoying when he would attack Lincoln's reputation not with evidence but merely by raising long lists of questions about wh [...]


    12. For anyone with even a modest interest in events leading to the Civil War, this was a disappointing read. I doubt that many people reading this book will be surprised to learn that Thomas Jefferson was a hypocritical elitist, that Abraham Lincoln was actually not in favor of abolition, and that most slave-owners wanted to keep slavery alive. The only reason I am giving this two stars instead of one is because it was well-researched -- even though this research seemed to focus mainly on unimporta [...]


    13. I really really wanted to read this book, but it is just impossible to read. Fred Kaplan is extremely wordy. He also apparently has a distaste for chronological order as I was always asking myself, "When did this event happen?" While there is good information in this book, it is very hard to persevere long enough to find it.


    14. There is a some good and interesting information in this book, but I gave it three stars because I think it's poorly written. The writing seems poorly organized in areas, and it doesn't flow well. But there is some interesting info. While I knew the info about Lincoln, I did learn new things about Adams, so it was worth reading overall.


    15. A bare faced, detailed look at the undercurrent of America's principals, beliefs, and attitudes of race relations as they applied to a growing nation, and instilled in its psyche and the men front and center, and behind the scenes who forced the challenge of change.



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