Seven American Deaths and Disasters What are the words we use to describe something that we never thought we d have to describe In Seven American Deaths and Disasters Kenneth Goldsmith transcribes historic radio and television reports

  • Title: Seven American Deaths and Disasters
  • Author: Kenneth Goldsmith
  • ISBN: 9781576876367
  • Page: 223
  • Format: Paperback
  • What are the words we use to describe something that we never thought we d have to describe In Seven American Deaths and Disasters , Kenneth Goldsmith transcribes historic radio and television reports of national tragedies as they unfurl, revealing an extraordinarily rich linguistic panorama of passionate description Taking its title from the series of Andy Warhol paintWhat are the words we use to describe something that we never thought we d have to describe In Seven American Deaths and Disasters, Kenneth Goldsmith transcribes historic radio and television reports of national tragedies as they unfurl, revealing an extraordinarily rich linguistic panorama of passionate description Taking its title from the series of Andy Warhol paintings by the same name, Goldsmith recasts the mundane as the iconic, creating a series of prose poems that encapsulate seven pivotal moments in recent American history the John F Kennedy, Robert F Kennedy, and John Lennon assassinations, the space shuttle Challenger disaster, the Columbine shootings, 9 11, and the death of Michael Jackson While we ve become accustomed to watching endless reruns of these tragic spectacles often to the point of clich once rendered in text, they become unfamiliar, and revealing new dimensions emerge Impartial reportage is revealed to be laced with subjectivity, bias, mystery, second guessing, and, in many cases, white knuckled fear Part nostalgia, part myth, these words render pivotal moments in American history through the communal lens of media.

    • Best Read [Kenneth Goldsmith] ✓ Seven American Deaths and Disasters || [Sports Book] PDF ñ
      223 Kenneth Goldsmith
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      Published :2019-06-12T21:35:46+00:00

    About "Kenneth Goldsmith"

    1. Kenneth Goldsmith

      Kenneth Goldsmith Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Seven American Deaths and Disasters book, this is one of the most wanted Kenneth Goldsmith author readers around the world.

    223 thoughts on “Seven American Deaths and Disasters”

    1. I'm very on the fence about this book; it's an interesting lens on the U.S. experience of the last 50 years, and from a purely literary angle it shows both how the unexpected affects language and expression and how Americans have communicated differently over time. Some sections, such as the Columbine transcript, are quite harrowing. Comparing coverage of similar events over time--Lennon and Jackson got very different treatments in the media, apparently--reveals differences in media tone and app [...]



    2. Kenneth Goldsmith has taken seven significant events in American history (although the death of Michael Jackson is questionable on that) and done nothing more than transcribed the reactions of people who were living through them as they happened. This relatively simple concept makes for absolutely riveting reading. Through the eyes of retrospect, we have 20/20 vision, but to hear the reporters, disc jockeys, and eyewitnesses give their account through the gauze of immediacy brings a fascinating [...]


    3. Goldsmith's notion of "uncreative writing" has bugged me for a while. Probably because I write fiction and teach "creative writing." And probably because his ongoing project of curation and transcription intrigued me (i.e. "wish I'd thought of that"). Not enough to read some of his previous books, which strike me as too steeped in the banal (though perhaps I'd be wrong about that). But "Seven American Deaths and Disasters" -- because it deals with extremely dramatic events -- manages to present [...]


    4. I first heard of this through the Colbert Report, which might be the modern day "I read this because it was on Oprah". The concept is so simple and brilliant: direct transcripts of human responses, mostly radio DJs, to major disasters and tragic events. It's about as close as you can get to recording real human emotional response. And somehow it's even more effective in writing than it is over the air. You have time slowly take in what's happening and what's going on in the minds of the responde [...]


    5. An inspiring, boring book (look up Kenneth Goldsmith if you think this is a bad thing), I was fascinated by the JFK poems in particular. However, just when your fatigue it at its height, you hit the afterword: it was like a wave tearing the earth out from under you, crystallizing all your experiences with the authors own. Sharp as a knife and a quick read.


    6. Haunting and unique. Transcripts of radio and television transmissions stretching from JFK over WTC to Michael Jackson.


    7. 3.5 starsI read this book over a long period of time since it was easy to put it down as it's broken into several sections, seven, of course, given the title, haha.As someone with a general interest in history, I can't say I would've picked these specific seven instances, perhaps a bit more variety. I would've removed Robert Kennedy and either John Lennon or Michael Jackson and replace them with something else, not sure what, but those sections were pretty much already there with John F. Kennedy [...]


    8. "The assassin was supposedly in a building about three or four stories up when he unleashed the deadly veil of bullets. We said deadly. That word was ill–advised. We will correct that" (Goldsmith, pg. #25)."And from New York City, only minutes after the president was shot, stocks moved actively lower, but a few issues stayed on the upside" (Goldsmith, pg. #26)."Everything seemed to be going well for Dallas today. The weather cleared up, everything cleared up, and the crowd was orderly at Love [...]


    9. Pretty fascinating. Most of the segments are disturbing on some level. The JFK segment stars off hauntingly by including radio commercials and songs that played in between as the news was breaking. The second Kennedy assassination is gripping because of the eyewitness accounts and hysteria, while the third assassination -- Lennon -- was a lot less intriguing to me due to the distance and calm it seemed the media had in comparison. (Maybe that was the point?) The Challenger explosion is emotional [...]


    10. As an exercize in collage poetry, it's a clever journey into both nostalgic tragedy and conceptual narrative structure as told through a copy-paste method of transcription of radio broadcasts. In the practice of reading, however, Goldsmith's book is a series of truly haunting accounts whose power is amplified by dramatic irony and the interpretation of tone. By deconstructing an aural medium on the page, the reader has to recreate and reinterpret these broadcasts based on personal recollection a [...]


    11. Rather a clever and interesting idea: Goldsmith transcribed the radio and television reports of seven American disasters as the situations were unfolding: JFK's assassination by a pop radio host who was in the midst of promoting Armour Star turkey breasts and Hamm's Beer and playing rock and roll tunes and911 then gradually realized the importance of what was going on (but still seemed more concerned about the health of Connolly and the blemish this would have on Big D); Bobby Kennedy's killing [...]


    12. This is a weird book to review. It is the transcripts from news broadcasts from seven important events over the last 60 years or so. I found the older events to be more satisfying from a historical perspective. The section on Columbine was brief and seemed like an afterthought and the inclusion of the death of Michael Jackson seemed out of context with the rest of the selections. While interesting, this is a limited offering. One noteworthy aspect is the ability to compare the news coverage from [...]


    13. Great resource for journalists, media theorists, absurdists, and anyone looking for an example of how to make sense of tragedyI started reading this in hopes of getting help with processing grief from the Orlando shooting. The medium of transcription and using it to archive tragedy in real time really drilled in the sense of stuplimity. How have humans in the past, reporters required to remain calm and narrate to the wider public, how do they improvise wisdom in the face of the worst forms of de [...]


    14. I saw this book on The Colbert Report, and I was immediately intrigued. This book is an especially interesting read because we know the outcomes of these stories, yet we get to read them exactly as they unfolded the day they happened. Even though we are familiar with each of these stories, it was fascinating to read the details. JFK and RFK were spoken of with something near reverence, while Michael Jackson, even as he lay dying, was spoken of with cruel humor and disregard. It is an intriguing [...]


    15. LacklusterI really thought the choices of the first three stories were smart. The selected transcriptions were informing and interesting. However from Lennon on, aside from Columbine, the choices were a bit trite and not diverse enough to represent our nation. It was interesting to watch the change in the tone of radio djs. But after the first part of the book I was just disappointed by the choices the author made in what he included and disclosed.


    16. I really thought the choices of the first three stories were smart. The selected transcriptions were informing and interesting. However from Lennon on, aside from Columbine, the choices were a bit trite and not diverse enough to represent our nation. It was interesting to watch the change in the tone of radio djs. But after the first part of the book I was just disappointed by the choices the author made in what he included and disclosed


    17. This is a fascinating book. The transcriptions in the book feel real in the pages, you feel as if these events are happening again or happening for the first time (if you were not born yet) that is gives a look at the world of humans and news when they are talking about real time events with no script or preparation that the humanity of the person shows through. It is a quick read but you may need to put down the book after reading an account just to say 'fuck?!'.


    18. The title of this book comes from the Andy Warhol paintings. This book contains prose poems that look at seven important moments in recent US history. The assassinations of John F. Kennedy, Robert F Kennedy, and John Lennon; the Challenger space shuttle explosion; The Columbine High School shootings; 9/11; and Michael Jackson's death.


    19. Honestly I don't know what to say about this book. was compelling, the subject matter was in some cases distressing and yet I couldn't put it down or turn away. The language swept me in and I knew I had to finish it no matter what. I think I love it and hate it at the same time makes me question why I enjoyed it.


    20. Just okay. An interesting-sounding experiment but the result is not more than the sum of its parts: transcriptions of various reporters (and one victim) trying to make coherent accounts of what has recently happened. I didn't find this profound in itself although, of course, there are many troubling emotions raised by the scenes being evoked.


    21. Clearly a fast read (finished in two days). I couldn't put it down. It was a great way to experience events that shaped our country (even the pop culture events). Without a doubt the recounting of 9/11 was the most moving for me. But being able to "expereince" the other events as if I was there when they happened was also emotional and enlightening. I recommend this book wholeheartedly.


    22. This book, while odd, really brought back tragic events during the 20th and 21st centuries that anyone who lived through them, will certainly remember. Actually transcripts from radio programming that were heard at the time(s) of each event(s). Sad, but I found it very interesting.


    23. Pretty interesting concept for a book. Transcripts of events that shaped the United States starting with the JFK assassination. The emotions displayed by the reporters and DJs as the react to the unfolding events rather reporting events that have already occurred is fascinating.


    24. an incredible book. it should be paired with other sources for inclusion in a classroom setting, but the urgency and fear and other emotions that exist within the passages are present on those pages.


    25. Transcriptions of radio and other media reports of pivotal tragic moments in present-day USA. Fascinating to watch the polish drop away as details emerge. JFK, RFK, John Lennon, Michael Jackson, Challenger, World Trade Center and Columbine--fascinating and evocative.


    26. Read this in a day - I am a news hound and this brought back some vivid memories of major news events in a whole new perspective, but also made me go back and do more research on the events that happened before I was born or when I was too young. I really liked this book.




    27. High-concept prose poetry that highlights both the compelling and the cliche in the language we use to articulate the unbelievable. It really was quite thought-provoking to me, and worth the read.


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